Diplomats face challenge of reassuring allies they’re not ‘s—hole countries’

After reports broke of President Donald Trump’s disparaging comments about Haiti and other African countries, the outrage overseas was swift — with governments demanding to know what the president really said and whether the U.S. would apologize.

Already, two top American diplomats have been summoned by their host countries — Earl Miller, the ambassador to Botswana, and Robin Diallo, the charge d’affaires to Haiti, the No. 2 in charge of the U.S. mission in the absence of an ambassador.

These diplomats and their colleagues elsewhere face a difficult challenge in defending the U.S.’s commitment to their host country without outright denying what the president said — something even the White House has not done, though Trump did deny he used “derogatory” language about Haitians in a tweet this morning. He did not, however, deny accounts from multiple sources either briefed on or familiar with the discussion who told ABC News the president’s comments extended to African countries as well.

So what is the State Department advising? According to internal guidance obtained by ABC News, the department is telling its diplomats to “reiterate that we have great respect for the people of Africa and all nations and our commitment remains strong.”

“Each Charge or Ambassador should note what a great honor it is to be in their post and how much they value the relationship with the people of the nation they are representing (use nation’s name),” the guidance reads.

Undersecretary of State Steve Goldstein said as much to reporters, telling diplomats to listen first to the concerns of the host country’s government before emphasizing that the U.S’s commitment to the country hasn’t wavered.

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